Efficacy non-gBRCAmut

ZEJULA May Give You More Options When Treating Patients by Sustaining Platinum Eligibility1

In the non-gBRCAmut cohort, the median PFS with ZEJULA was more than 2x longer than placebo2,3

  • BRCA wild-type tumors are historically difficult to treat and are associated with poorer outcomes5,6
  • In the non-gBRCAmut cohort, approximately 13.4% of women were known to be sBRCAmut3

Continued platinum eligibility was achieved in 73% of non-gBRCAmut patients receiving ZEJULA and 47% of patients receiving placebo1

Platinum eligibility was defined by a platinum-free interval of ≥6 months.7
This analysis is exploratory in nature; it does not control for type 1 error and is not powered to determine treatment effect.1
 

Is There More That Can Be Done for BRCAwt Patients?

Learn about the effectiveness of PARP inhibitors in difficult-to-treat BRCAwt patients.

ZEJULA improved median PFS for patients with BRCAwt tumors1,3,4

This subgroup analysis is exploratory in nature; it does not control for type 1 error and is not powered to determine treatment effect in any subgroup.1

Continued platinum eligibility was achieved in 70% of BRCAwt patients receiving ZEJULA and 45% of patients receiving placebo1

Platinum eligibility as defined by a platinum-free interval of ≥6 months.7
This analysis is exploratory in nature; it does not control for type 1 error and is not powered to determine treatment effect.

ZEJULA Provided More Time Without Disease Progression, Independent of Baseline Patient Characteristics1-3

This analysis is exploratory in nature; it does not control for type 1 error and is not powered to determine treatment effect in any subgroup.1-3
 

BRCA, breast cancer susceptibility gene; BRCAwt; BRCA wild type; CI, confidence interval; gBRCAmut, germline BRCA mutated; HR, hazard ratio; HRD, homologous recombination deficiency; HRDneg, HRD negative; HRDpos, HRD positive; non-gBRCAmut, not germline BRCA mutated; PFS, progression-free survival; PR, partial response; sBRCAmut, somatic BRCA mutated.

References: 1. Data on file. TESARO, Inc. 2. ZEJULA (niraparib) [package insert]. Waltham, MA: TESARO, Inc.; February 2019. 3. Mirza MR, Monk BJ, Herrstedt J, et al; ENGOT-OV16/NOVA Investigators. Niraparib maintenance therapy in platinum-sensitive, recurrent ovarian cancer. N Engl J Med. 2016;375(22):2154-2164, and Supplementary Appendix. 4. Matulonis UA, Herrstedt J, Tinker AV, et al. Long-term benefit of niraparib treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer (OC). Poster presented at: American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting; June 2-6, 2017; Chicago, IL. Poster 5534. 5. Bryant HE, Schultz N, Thomas HD, et al. Specific killing of BRCA2-deficient tumours with inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Nature. 2005;434(7035):913-917. 6. Farmer H, McCabe N, Lord CJ, et al. Targeting the DNA repair defect in BRCA mutant cells as a therapeutic strategy. Nature. 2005;434(7035):917-921. 7. Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Ovarian Cancer including Fallopian Tube Cancer and Primary Peritoneal Cancer V.4.2017. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2017. All rights reserved. Accessed January 16, 2018. To view the most recent and complete version of the guidelines, go online to NCCN.org.

Efficacy data

EFFICACY DATA

View PFS by cohort, including gBRCAmut

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Safety data

SAFETY DATA

Learn about the safety and tolerability of ZEJULA

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